The Engagement Challenge

One of the key drivers of E-Line’s vision is to address the increasing lack of engagement with youth in school. School dropout rates across the country have reached epidemic proportions, and America is falling behind our competitor nations on math, science and literacy scores. As a result, the nation’s prominence in commerce, industry, science and technological innovation faces a very real threat. Underlying this crisis are the following statistics:

  • 7,000 students drop out of school every day (more than 1 million every year)
  • 1/3 of public high school students fail to graduate
  • 1/2 of African Americans, Native Americans and Hispanic high school students fail to graduate

While there is no single cause driving student dropout, one overarching factor is the lack of motivation and relevance most adolescents report in assessing their school environments. In a 2006 study conducted for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, 69% of students said they were not motivated or inspired in school. They expressed feelings of being disconnected and bored, and doubted the real-world relevance of their classes. The economic and social impact of this problem is massive in terms of unemployment, public assistance and public health. A lack of education also has direct results on the stability of the nation and the potential for communities to thrive. As evidence, nearly 50% of African-American males who drop out of school end up in prison.

Game-based learning has emerged as one of the most promising areas of innovation in making academic content more engaging and relevant for America’s youth, and in promoting the types of skills demanded by growing numbers of employers. A recent white paper by the New Media Institute outlines the value of such learning. According to its author: “Harness the power of well-designed games to achieve specific learning goals, and the result is a workforce of highly motivated learners who avidly engage with and practice applying problem-solving skills.” Indeed, computer and video games have shown promise in promoting inquiry, literacy, creativity, collaboration, problem solving and system design skills needed to learn standards-based content, develop an understanding of STEM concepts, and build critical skills that are essential for preparing youth for successful high school completion, college success and, eventually, 21st century careers.

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Kids in Columbia, MD, helping each other learn with Gamestar Mechanic.

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The Blog Launches

In the last five years since launching E-Line Media, we have witnessed an incredible shift in perspective about the value of games for learning. Supported by a wealth of research and strong quantitative and qualitative feedback, the educational system has come to embrace games as an incredible way to motivate students’ interest in a variety of learning areas. Here at E-Line, we have been extremely pleased and encouraged by the number of teachers who have excitedly adopted Gamestar Mechanic, our first game-based learning product that has now been used by more than 350,000 youth and is in over 4,000 schools and after-school programs. We have also been excited to see the number of very strong learning games that have emerged from academia, organizations and studios focusing on educational and social impact games.

While we continue to see the power of games explored in a variety of positive ways, we believe that a place is necessary where we can share the many ideas, perspectives, tools, resources and research that are available and that will become available. We hope this blog will be just that. We are modeling this blog after a lab – a place for exploration, discussion, trial and error. We encourage those who are interested in games for learning or who are participants in the space to be contributors to this site. We look forward to building it with you.